Fun facts about South Korea

Just for fun i’ll give you some facts about South Korea that might be pretty funny for some of you … So here we go 😉

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1. When the first night of the new year comes everybody hides their shoes. This is because there is a belief that a ghost will come down and try on everyone’s shoes. If the ghost finds a pair it likes it will take it. It is thought that the owner of the shoes will then have bad luck for the whole year.

2. Fruit is a luxury item. Fruit in Korea is already absurdly expensive, but especially due to the high levels of rain as of late, it’s costing Koreans even more than normal. (What is one of the most expensive fruits? WATERMELON – at about 30,000 won, which is equal to about $30.00 in Canada.)

 3. Korean taxis are color coded and each color is an indicator of the type of services you can avail. For example, gray and white taxis offer basic comfort, whereas a black colored cab is a luxurious car and a veteran driver. The Korean drivers are notorious for watching TV in the can while driving passengers around.

4. Koreans eat SPAM like it’s going out of style. Why is it so popular? Well, during the war, soldiers were supplied with a lot of canned foods, so they ended up creating something we know now as Military Stew, which has water and spices as broth, with all of the various canned foods and vegetables boiled together to make a hearty feast. The population ended up picking up on the SPAM after this creation and starting adding it to other soups and recipes. It ended Continue reading

Things You Should Know About South Korea

Here’s some brief information that you should know about south Korea!

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 The South Korean flag: The black lines are called Trigrams and they represent harmony. The yin-yang in the center, symbolizes balance within the universe.

 South Korea’s population as of July 2009 was 48,508,972. Its capital, Seoul, is one of its largest cities with a population of over ten million.

 The official language of South Korea is Korean but English is taught widely in the country’s schools. In addition, Japanese is common in South Korea.

 The population of South Korea is composed of 99.9% Korean but 0.1% the population is Chinese.

The dominant religious groups in South Korea are Christian and Buddhist, however a large percent of South Koreans claim no religious preference.

 South Korea’s government is a republic with a single legislative body which is comprised of the National Assembly or Kukhoe. The executive branch is made up of chief of state who is the country’s president and a head of government who is the prime minister.

 Most of South Korea’s topography is mountainous with its highest point being Halla-san at 6,398 feet (1,950 m). Halla-san is an extinct volcano.

 Around two-thirds of the land in South Korea is forested. This includes the mainland and Continue reading

White Day: Payback time !

As the whole world know, Valentine’s Day is celebrated on February 14th every year. It’s the most romantic day on earth where couples would buy gifts to their better halves. In Korea however, only women  would buy chocolates and give them to their partner. S like that,
everyone will be happy 😉

It’s like a ‘payback’ time. On White Day, women expect to receive the chocolates in return of what they’ve given the men on Valentine’s Day. Sounds weird to you? But that’s how it works in Korea. If the guys receive chocolates on V day, they are expected to return the ‘favor’ on W day. Whatever it takes, they must.

Origin:

White Day was first celebrated in1978 in Japan.It was started by the National Confectionery Industry Association as an “answer day” to Valentine’s Day on the grounds that men should pay back the women who gave them chocolate and

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11/11 Time to eat some Pepero !

In Korea, there are many special days celebrated, sometimes for no special reasons at all. And Pepero Day is the exact example of such celebration. But it’s kind of cute how they make11.11 (11th day of November) special. So yes, Pepero Day is celebrated on 11.11 every year.

Pepero is a cookie stick, dipped in chocolate, manufactured by Lotte Confectionery in South Korea since 1983. Pepero Day is somewhat similar to Valentine’s Day and is held on 11th of November, since the date “11-11” resembles four sticks of Pepero. Currently Lotte has come up with various types of flavors for their Peperos.

So what do people do on Pepero Day? It’s actually akin to Valentine’s Day as couples (and also friends) exchange or give Pepero to their loved ones.

11.11 looks like a big yummy row of Pepero sticks, and it’s no coincidence that Pepero Day falls on this date! The clever peeps at Lotte created this day as a commercial haven to maximise sales of their yummy Continue reading

South Korea: Cultural Etiquette

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The People

Korea is one of the most homogeneous countries in the world, racially and linguistically. It has its own culture, language, dress and cuisine, separate and distinct from its neighboring countries. Hard work, filial piety and modesty are characteristics esteemed by Koreans. They are proud of their traditional culture and their modern economic success. Education is highly valued as the path to status, money and success.

Meeting and Greeting

  • The bow is the traditional Korean greeting, although it is often accompanied by a handshake among men. To show respect when shaking hands, support your right forearm with your left hand.
  • Korean women usually nod slightly and will not shake hands with Western men. Western women may offer their hand to a Korean man.
  • Bow when departing. Younger people wave (move their arm from side to side).

Names and Titles

15 Most Unusual Korean Dishes!

15. Budae Jjigae (Army Base Stew ):

After enduring the second world war, and then the Korean War, the Korean people were left hungry and in need. In order to feed their families, many parents who lived near US army bases took surplus supplies of army goods such as spam and canned frankfurters and added them to a basic kimchi stew. The end result was Army Base Stew. This stew, which can have virtually anything in it – including eggs and ramen noodles – has spread across South Korea and is wildly popular to this day.

14. Dakbal (Chicken Feet ) :

Chicken feet are probably one of the least unusual entries on this list, considering that most countries with a Chinese restaurant can get Chinese-style chicken feet. The texture of this dish is very unusual to western palettes – it is sinewy and chewy. Once you get past the idea that you are eating feet, this dish is truly delectable and I couldn’t recommend it enough.

13. Gejang (Raw Crabs):

These delightful little crabs are not cooked before consumption; instead they are seasoned with various sauces and eaten raw. Interestingly another raw seafood dish of baby crabs is soft enough that you also eat the shells which are not unlike a slightly Continue reading