This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

Fun facts about South Korea

Just for fun i’ll give you some facts about South Korea that might be pretty funny for some of you … So here we go 😉

laugh

1. When the first night of the new year comes everybody hides their shoes. This is because there is a belief that a ghost will come down and try on everyone’s shoes. If the ghost finds a pair it likes it will take it. It is thought that the owner of the shoes will then have bad luck for the whole year.

2. Fruit is a luxury item. Fruit in Korea is already absurdly expensive, but especially due to the high levels of rain as of late, it’s costing Koreans even more than normal. (What is one of the most expensive fruits? WATERMELON – at about 30,000 won, which is equal to about $30.00 in Canada.)

 3. Korean taxis are color coded and each color is an indicator of the type of services you can avail. For example, gray and white taxis offer basic comfort, whereas a black colored cab is a luxurious car and a veteran driver. The Korean drivers are notorious for watching TV in the can while driving passengers around.

4. Koreans eat SPAM like it’s going out of style. Why is it so popular? Well, during the war, soldiers were supplied with a lot of canned foods, so they ended up creating something we know now as Military Stew, which has water and spices as broth, with all of the various canned foods and vegetables boiled together to make a hearty feast. The population ended up picking up on the SPAM after this creation and starting adding it to other soups and recipes. It ended Continue reading

White Day: Payback time !

As the whole world know, Valentine’s Day is celebrated on February 14th every year. It’s the most romantic day on earth where couples would buy gifts to their better halves. In Korea however, only women  would buy chocolates and give them to their partner. S like that,
everyone will be happy 😉

It’s like a ‘payback’ time. On White Day, women expect to receive the chocolates in return of what they’ve given the men on Valentine’s Day. Sounds weird to you? But that’s how it works in Korea. If the guys receive chocolates on V day, they are expected to return the ‘favor’ on W day. Whatever it takes, they must.

Origin:

White Day was first celebrated in1978 in Japan.It was started by the National Confectionery Industry Association as an “answer day” to Valentine’s Day on the grounds that men should pay back the women who gave them chocolate and

Continue reading

Korean Superstitions

 

Superstitions had exist in all countries, and it’s not related only to undeveloped countries … And that is the case for South korea. In this article I will give you some of their superstitions and some of them might surprise you !

1. Fan Death:

A common Korean superstition that has been present in South Korean culture for quite some was after the invention of the electric fan. A really random idea from a random person thought that having an electric fan running overnight in a closed room (doors and windows shut) could kill you by either suffocation or hypothermia. This phenomenon is known as, “Fan Death.” You might notice that the weather in Korea in the summer time is very hot and humid. So what’s a good way to cool off your naked body on a hot, humid summer day? Cooling yourself off with an electric fan, of course. The “Fan Death” superstition has become so popular in the Korean culture that companies who make fans started to incorporate timers in these electric fans so that you can set it to turn off by itself when you are asleep.

2. Writing Names in Red :

Traditionally, red is the color used to write the names of the dead in Korea. To write the names of the living in red is therefore considered very unlucky, and to some is akin to the kiss of death.

 3. Whistling At Night:

There was this common Korean superstition that whistling at Continue reading

Korean new year


new year

Korean New Year, commonly known as Seol-nal, is the first day of the lunar calendar. It is the most important of the traditional Korean holidays. It consists of a period of celebrations, starting on New Year’s Day. Koreans also celebrate solar New Year’s Day on January 1 each year, following the Gregorian Calendar. On the day of Seollal, everyone gets up early, puts on their best clothes, children wish their elders  (grandparents, aunts and uncles, parents) a happy new year by performing one deep traditional bow and the words saehae bok mani badeuseyo  which translates to Receive many New Year blessings, or more loosely, “Have a blessed New Year.” Parents typically reward this gesture by giving their children new year’s money, or “pocket money,” (usually in the form of crisp paper money) in luck bags made with beautiful silk design and offering words of wisdom, deokdam. Historically, parents gave out rice cakes (ddeok) and fruit to their children instead. Before and during the bowing ceremony, children wear hanboks as a respectful way to appreciate ancestors and elders. This activity is called Sebae.

Many traditional games are associated with the Korean New Year. The traditional family board game yunnori  is still a popular game nowadays. Yut Nori (Yunnori) is a traditional board game played in Korea, especially during Korean New Year. It is played using different types of specially designed sticks. Traditionally men and boys would fly rectangle kites called yeonnalligi, and play jegi chagi, a game in which a light object is wrapped in paper or cloth, and then kicked in a footbag like manner. Korean women and girls would have traditionally played neolttwigi, a game of jumping on a seesaw , and gongginolie, game played with five little gonggi (originally a little stone, but today many buy manufactured gongi in shops) while children spin paengi .

SEOUL – Deoksugung

Seoul Keoksugunge

Deoksugung, also known as Gyeongun-gung, Deoksugung Palace, or Deoksu Palace, is a walled compound of palaces in Seoul that was inhabited by various Korean royalties until the Japanese occupation of Korea around the turn of the 20th century. The buildings are of varying construction, including some of natural cryptomeria wood[citation needed]), painted wood, and stucco. Some buildings were built in Western style.
In addition to the traditional palace buildings, there are also an art museum, forested gardens, and a statue of King Sejong the Great at Deoksugung. The palace is located near the City Hall Station.
Deoksugung, like the other “Five Grand Palaces” in Seoul, was intentionally heavily destroyed during the Japanese occupation of Korea. Currently, only one third of the structures that were standing before the occupation, remains.