15 Most Unusual Korean Dishes!

15. Budae Jjigae (Army Base Stew ):

After enduring the second world war, and then the Korean War, the Korean people were left hungry and in need. In order to feed their families, many parents who lived near US army bases took surplus supplies of army goods such as spam and canned frankfurters and added them to a basic kimchi stew. The end result was Army Base Stew. This stew, which can have virtually anything in it – including eggs and ramen noodles – has spread across South Korea and is wildly popular to this day.

14. Dakbal (Chicken Feet ) :

Chicken feet are probably one of the least unusual entries on this list, considering that most countries with a Chinese restaurant can get Chinese-style chicken feet. The texture of this dish is very unusual to western palettes – it is sinewy and chewy. Once you get past the idea that you are eating feet, this dish is truly delectable and I couldn’t recommend it enough.

13. Gejang (Raw Crabs):

These delightful little crabs are not cooked before consumption; instead they are seasoned with various sauces and eaten raw. Interestingly another raw seafood dish of baby crabs is soft enough that you also eat the shells which are not unlike a slightly Continue reading

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Korean Traditional Clothing

   Traditional Korean clothing has its roots extending back at least as far as the Three Kingdoms Period (57 B.C. – 668 A.D.), as evidenced by wall paintings in tombs dating from this period. The Korean hanbok represents one of the most visable aspects of Korean culture.

The top part called a jeogori is blouse-like with long sleeves with the men’s version being longer, stretching down to the waist. Women wear skirts (chima) while men wear baggy pants (paji). Commoners wore white, except during festivals and special occassions such as weddings. Clothes for the upper classes were made of bright colors
and indicated the wearer’s social status. Various accessories such as foot gear, jewelry, and headdresses or hair pins completed the outfit.

Materials:

Clothes and accessories are made from a wide variety of materials. Different areas of Korea are famous for their specialized fabrics. Hansan, South Ch’ungch’ong Province, made such famous white ramie that it was sent to the Tang Chinese court for tribute during the Koryoperiod (918 – 1392). Andong hem was also favored by the yangban (upper class). The materials and manufacturing techniques strongly mirror Korean culture and society.

  • Fabrics:Because of the diverse weather conditions, clothes have been made from hemp, ramie, cotton muslin, silk, and satin. Cooler weather demanded heavier fabric, lined with fur in the northern regions, while sumer clothes used thinner materials that allowed breezes to cool the body. In the autumn, many women would wear clothes of gossamer silk because it gave a rustling sound while walking that is similar to walking through dry leaves.
  • Colors: White represents purity, integrity, and chastity, and was the most common color for common clothes. The upper class and court figures wore clothes in red, yellow, blue, and black in addition to white. These colors, symbolize the five traditional elements in Oriental cosmology (fire, earth, water, metal, and wood). Dyes were made from Continue reading