15 Most Unusual Korean Dishes!

15. Budae Jjigae (Army Base Stew ):

After enduring the second world war, and then the Korean War, the Korean people were left hungry and in need. In order to feed their families, many parents who lived near US army bases took surplus supplies of army goods such as spam and canned frankfurters and added them to a basic kimchi stew. The end result was Army Base Stew. This stew, which can have virtually anything in it – including eggs and ramen noodles – has spread across South Korea and is wildly popular to this day.

14. Dakbal (Chicken Feet ) :

Chicken feet are probably one of the least unusual entries on this list, considering that most countries with a Chinese restaurant can get Chinese-style chicken feet. The texture of this dish is very unusual to western palettes – it is sinewy and chewy. Once you get past the idea that you are eating feet, this dish is truly delectable and I couldn’t recommend it enough.

13. Gejang (Raw Crabs):

These delightful little crabs are not cooked before consumption; instead they are seasoned with various sauces and eaten raw. Interestingly another raw seafood dish of baby crabs is soft enough that you also eat the shells which are not unlike a slightly Continue reading

If you like to snack, you’ll have lots to do in South Korea!

Although Korean cuisine is quite distinctive, it does have some features in common with other Oriental cultures. Since the korean food is considered by many to be quite healthy and since Koreans now live in many countries, Korean restaurants have been popping up all over the world.

While there’s a tantalizing restaurant every few meters throughout the entire city, it’s street food carts and tents that fill all the open spaces. Walking through Seoul is like having to walk through a slot canyon of culinary goodies all calling your name.

Unlike Bangkok street food where you can eat entire meals on the sidewalk,  most Korean street food in Seoul to be more along the lines of snack material.

Instead of wolfing down bowls of rice and full dishes, Korean street food is often reserved for things that can be eaten standing up, especially catering to Seoulites that are running from subway to subway. Stuff on sticks or things can can be eaten with toothpicks are common.

Korean street food carts are bulky and quite sturdy in design, kind of like boats of food on wheels.

Gimbap – Korean Street Food

Gimbap :

As a beloved South Korean food, you can be assured gimbap is available in restaurants and on the street too. Packed onto street carts, often accompanied by tteokbokki, gimbap begins with a sheet of sea Continue reading